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  • Marnie was a mystery to everyone but herself. She knew what she wanted – she just hadn’t seen it yet. She had infinite patience. She knew it would eventually come into her life. She was just biding her time until it did. She played the game, went through the motions, and quietly kept it all to herself. It’s not that she was selfish in that way – she just didn’t feel the need to waste words for anything that she didn’t think was that important, and so far, she hadn’t found anything that important to spend a lot of words on.

    While she didn’t talk much, she did have a remarkable presence about her. People felt at ease around her, were drawn to her. She enjoyed the company of others, but did not require it. She could be just as happy by herself, with a good book, or with a group of friends. She was quite comfortable in her own skin

    She wasn’t what you would term a classic beauty, but she had such a unique, open and natural look, she was truly beautiful. It began with her eyes. They were “knowing” eyes – she looked at you, and you felt like she could see right into your soul, and they danced with just the hint of a grin, which you felt was a sign of approval, that she liked what she saw.

    She was standing at the bus stop, waiting for the bus to take her back home, after a long day at work. She wasn’t tired, as her job was not that strenuous. She was just in her usual state of anticipation – waiting. On this day, she had felt an excitement, on the train that brought her to this station where she would transfer to the bus. She didn’t know where it came from, this feeling, but she knew it meant something. So, she just patiently waited for it to reveal itself.
  • Hank emerged from the train, and was making his way to his car in the lot, which took him right past the bus stop. For a fleeting moment, he had a second thought about what he was doing – “My backpack, laptop, all my papers”. He stopped in his tracks, slightly panicked, and turned to run back to the train to get what he’d left behind. His sudden change of direction caught Marnie’s attention.

    She looked at him, curiously. He looked back at her, and broke out into a laugh. “No, I’m done with all of that”, he thought, and turned back around, continuing his journey to his car. He looked back again, and she was still looking at him, still with that look of curiosity on her face. “Who is she?”, he thought. “Do I know her?”

    All Marnie knew was that she needed to talk to this guy. She had no idea what she was going to say, but from the moment he first caught her attention, she’d felt that excitement again, even stronger than on the train. This must be what that was all about. She didn’t question why, or who he was, she just knew, and followed her instinct, as she always did. She smiled at him, knowing that would bring him to her. It did.

    “Do I know you?”, he asked.

    “I don’t believe we’ve ever met”, she said, with her knowing smile.

    “I know,I know, I can’t place it – but, I feel like I know you.”

    Marnie just laughed, and waited. The bus pulled up. “Well, this is my bus. I have to get home.” She began to walk towards the open door of the bus, and Hank said, “Look, I know this is crazy, but can I give you a lift home? It makes no sense, but I feel like we need to talk. I’m not trying to pick you up, or anything like that…”

    “Sure”, she said, with a smile. She followed him to his car.
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