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  • I rarely read a book twice. I find it difficult to embrace the same emotion from the same words, from the same characters. Once I know the end, I tend to leave the story, satisfied that it's over. It is a feeling I suffer from. It is a mild, painless disease.

    So, when I sat down at my desk to get started on a project for my Literature degree, I struggled. I have read the classics, but I have read them once, ticked them off a pretencious list, and mainly been disappointed. I own no Library, but the thirty-ish books I have with me at University are mainly untouched. Not in the sense that they haven't been used, but more so that once read they have been left on the same shelf to gather a years worth of dust and settle amongst words that share similiar defects.

    Except one.

    I am the Messenger.

    The story of Ed, a young cabdriver who finds himself entangled in a situation that forces him to help those around him in ways that to this day make me smile and damn near cry. You should read it. Everybody should read it. It puts into perspective the power of random acts of kindness, as well as caring for those close to you, even when those feelings aren't returned. This books overwhelms me with quotes of raw emotion, and so I leave you with this:

    “Sometimes people are beautiful.
    Not in looks.
    Not in what they say.
    Just in what they are.”
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