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  • Harriet was that tortoise related to Darwin and Galapagos. She lived for 176 years and died in 2006.

    She supposedly brought to the man/scientist some questions about Human nature as an enigma to Darwin. Being not of same Human nature of him (or better, being a tortoise...), she spoke to that "new" man in an universal language – music – that everything they both presented to each other were indeed re-representation of what they had always been. Everything in them both was old, and new was always just an illusion.

    As a turtle from an isolated territory as Galapagos, she didn´t have intention to give answers, but to issue her opinions. In her case, one was that she was so precious only because her ancestors had stayed at the same place for thousands of years. For her, there was not "another kind of tortoise", and there was not even “another tortoise”; there was just "tortoise", and that was her difference from all the others, according to Chelonian characters combined to an untouched piece of natural world.

    So what did the man/scientist do? What did he pursuit, that was not at the place where he already was? Was it the untouchable purity of Human heart that seemed to be lost?

    Harriet told Darwin that Monkey was what the Man was. Knowing to be just Monkey, anything could be developed: marine life and the unconsciousness; the "unpredictable, but not unexpected" Nature, the Human curiosity, conversations about feline perfection…

    Supposedly. Real data points out that Harriet probably didn’t come from Galapagos, and Darwin didn’t have her in his yard to talk about the evolution of mind with music. Maybe he didn’t meet her, but we heard the sounds of Harriet singing this song along her time!

    Suppositions bypass the wrong of reality and give it a nice conclusion until the monkeys march..
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