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  • About 15 years ago, I decided I needed a small point and shoot camera. I hadn't gone digital yet, and I had big heavy Nikon film cameras. My fibromyalgia was so painful that walking was difficult for me and the heavy cameras exacerbated my pain. I wanted to be able to take short walks and photograph what I saw even on bad days. But I had strong misgivings about buying a point and shoot camera.

    I borrowed one from the photo shop and bought a roll of film and walked to the empty lot next door to run the film though the camera to test it.
  • My first look at the empty lot was less than inspiring, but I forged in, looking for something to photograph. I looked closely at the puddles, weeds, rocks and mud, and made 24 photographs. The photographs are nothing to get particularly excited about. What I was excited about was the experience. I found the deep concentration to be like a meditation. I remember that day as if it were yesterday, sharp and clear, while many of my other days have long been forgotten. I find this happens again and again. Taking photographs puts me in "the Zone."

    While I may be disappointed with the photographs later, through my own lack of competence or equipment failure, I remember the experience of looking closely, of being deeply attentive.
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