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  • Journey of a “Pontiac Dancer”
    by John Greenwood

    Marcel Donaj’ s life-journey has been a twisted braid of whiskered experience and strong jawed emotion, wound tight with gentle laughter and tinges of pain. Marcel spent his late teens dancing with a 1960 Pontiac; from York Beach to Williamstown, “ in two-and-a-half hours, flat!” As a young, work-ethic-laced father, the Boston Maine Railroad kept his direction true and his family alone. Crates overflowing with black and white negatives and piles of memory-chipstored photographs await resurrection. A self-proclaimed lover of automobiles and all things related, Marcel is a driven-driver, a builder of bridges, an ex-tepee dweller, and a known-to-be-no-billboard-immune, graffiti artist. The poem below is dedicated to this multilayered man. Gently peel apart the lines to see inside.
    LeCram #5700

    Down the plank of a steamship
    in the arms of his mother
    Raised in tall Greylock shadows
    filled with immigrants proud
    —-
    Pontiac Dancer
    Driving railroad-straight
    or hill-climb fast
    From York Beach, M aine
    to Green River Road

    Woodstock hints
    scattered and dear
    Hippie-warm spirit
    clings to a soul

    Alive in rooms dark
    heart full of bold
    Cramming life into photographs
    and blue-collar sweat
    —-
    eltbuS signs r4hymn
    in Sunday night whispers
    Graffiti up high
    no Escalade safe
    ———-
    Four decades in
    a father proclaims,
    “My son the artist”
    will honor my name
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