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  • “Anytime...you’re feeling lonely.”

    The serendipity of the song selection from the ancient jukebox was uncanny.

    “Anytime…you’re feeling blue.”

    Since there is no random play option on this vast collection of 45s from the 1950’s to the present, someone who’s in this bar at the exact same time as me has put their money where my heart is.

    “You know, neuroscientists have speculated that music preceded language in the evolution of intelligence and it was only by learning to sustain oxygen flow across the larynx did humans begin to make sounds that approached language,” a husky-voiced woman of indeterminate age who sat two seats down the bar casually opined to no one in particular.

    "Oh yeah?"

    "Therefore, music is more basic to communication than speaking and you're absolutely right in thinking that there is no such thing as coincidence when it comes to messages in music. They occur when they're needed."

    “What are you, a mind-reader?”

    “Well, if you mean can I tell you’re getting more out of this song than Eddy Arnold intended when he cut the record, yes, I’m a mind-reader.”

    “Then you probably know that this tune was the most-played jukebox song of 1948.”

    “No I didn’t. I just like this tune too. Let me remind you, my professional area is not music but rather mind reading.”

    “So, what am I thinking?”

    “You’re thinking that I might want another drink and you’re right.”

    “Hey, you’re good.”

    “You have no idea how good.”

    “Anytime…you feel downhearted. That will prove your love for me is true.”




    "Anytime" performance http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnA12r8j-pw
    “Anytime” Lyrics by Happy Lawson published in 1921
    Photo from Flickr Creative Commons Randomedea
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