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  • We were on our way to get our car but I stopped to take a picture of this shop.

    Here and there a few relics of another era still exist.
    This shop window caught my eye in the increasingly glass and chrome world.
    It stood out to me, but also blends into the buildings next to it.
    Perhaps it will continue to fade back into the past until one day it will have vanished altogether.
    A new shop will come along and new neighbors will move onto the block.
    One or two people might carry the memory forward and preserve the shadow of the past in a dim recollection.
    As they pass the old storefront a chimera of what was will emanate briefly.


    This was the era of my Grandfather’s New York.
    This was the trade my Husband’s grandfather lived by.

    My husband’s Grandfather, Morris was a tailor and made ladies coats and dresses.
    The clothing was well made from beautiful fabrics.

    Morris worked in Lower Manhattan and lived in the Bronx, past the top of Manhattan.
    It cost a nickel for the train ride but some days he spent that nickel on lunch and walked home.

    He had been born and raised in Hungary, or it was then, and lived in the Carpathian Mountains.
    They left their home by horse and cart and went to France and then on to America.

    They left their home in the Carpathian Mountains 6 months before World War II broke out.


    Traces of the past remain and sometimes a building will stir the memories into motion.
    We were on our way to get our car and I found myself staring into the jaws of history.
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