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  • What is it with the live performance of a duet in a park that compels me to stop, listen and be moved? It’s not like their voices were stellar; the harmony, harmonious.

    Yet there I was, taking quick strides around the corner from the federal court building for a quick fish taco when I faintly heard a tune from my childhood: “If” by The Doors. The woman’s voice had a Fiona Apple-ish quality about it and the guy’s, not anyone’s in particular, but I had to stop listening to my pangs and do a turn-about to follow the wafting melody.

    Hers is a “child-ish” voice, one of those high-pitch kinds that spark facebook debates as to whether or not it is even worth listening to. The usual verdict goes like this: females think it’s screechy, men think it’s sexeeeh. For me, it was —hm—kinda charming, I guess. Could be because it was free and unexpected. But probably because I’m just a sucker for live lovers.

    Plus, I’ve dug (to use an era term) that song since it was "airborne" especially the instrumental part. And by the time I got near enough to film them — goosebumps: the guy’s guitar chops absolutely made skipping Gulf coast seafood lunch worthwhile.

    Then the icing on the cake: when he looked my way and realized he was being filmed: the sudden. dip. of voice. “Tomorrow and today…” Oooh. The unexpected quiver on my breasts and on my lips. Gets me ev.ry.time.
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