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  • The Self-Healed crystal is one that was separated from a secure base or was damaged during growth, but continued to reach the inherent natural state of perfection by forming smaller terminated faces. These faces together appear like a lace type design of finished edges.
    - songofstones.com

    I came upon this quartz crystal at a roadside stand when we were passing through Arkansas on a road trip almost ten years ago.

    It is called a 'Self-Healed' crystal. At some point, this piece broke away from an anchored quartz crystal. From the size of the more 'perfect' flat sides (in the upper left), it's clear that its parent crystal was quite large.

    After breaking away, this crystal was suspended in the mud of the earth for some time. During that time, it continued to grow and develop. It 'continued to reach the inherent natural state of perfection'. As a result of this natural process, the crystal healed each and every one of of its broken edges.

    The fact that it is a broken crystal is, of course, still very apparent. The wounds and scars will never go away. And yet, its brokenness is the source of its beauty. It is the very wounds and scars that make it so attractive! It has become a complex, mesmerizing, multifaceted work of art. With myriad new possibilities for reflecting Light into the world!


    [Photos by Barbara, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2010]
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