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  • I am drawn to intersections of new and old; natural and synthetic.

    A large grid spanned 30 blocks east to west just a block from my last apartment. It section off the dramatic and expansive Alberta sky into classic shapes. I use to run along the path that followed the grid, watching the fences alternate from chain link to tall freshly painted boards. Despite the dense population in this neighborhood, it was usually just me and the power lines.

    On my way home, I’d pass the manmade lake. Each house surrounding it sat tall and independent; insulating it’s owners in the comfort of their customized lives. The houses were perfectly spaced a polite distance from one another and proudly reflected off the lake's glass surface.

    The last half kilometer was a loop around the box stores. People drove their SUV’s 5 minutes to pick up food, liquor and prescriptions. Shopping trips could be easily done in 20 minutes, including driving time. I’d carefully pay attention to the parking lot entrances watching for cars not watching for me.

    Returning to the apartment, the halls smelled for better or worse a melody of international foods. I never met my neighbors, but some days I really wish I had.

    People hated the power lines. They worried about their health and called it an ugly mark on their otherwise lovely community. I don’t miss them myself, but wish the people still living there would take time to listen to the buzz.
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