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  • It is alleged that some 2,200 years ago a man named Archimedes lowered himself into a filled tub of water. The water overflowed onto the floor. Archimedes came to the sudden realization that by this method, the volume of an irregularly shaped solid might be measured. He was so overtaken by enthusiasm that the legend says that he jumped from the tub and ran through the streets of Syracuse announcing to all, "Eureka! Eureka!"; which means, "I have found it! I have found it!" However, in his enthusiasm he had neglected to find his toga - or any other kind of clothing. Onlookers must surely have wondered just what it was he thought he had found.

    This Archimedes character is considered to be one of the greatest mathematicians of all time. He is also very highly regarded as a physicist, engineer, inventor, astronomer, and philosopher. Yet, it seems that he was at times unable to find his own cloths; and was quite excited about it. He appeared to be quite deluded; to others; at the time.

    Well, I am an engineer too. I have been excited and enthusiastic a number of times; in any number of ways and on several subjects. I imagine that should I become so excited as Archimedes and proceed to run down Main Street in Urbana, Illinois - between the courthouse and the county sheriff's department shouting that "I had found it", but with no cloths, someone might find me a bed other than my own for the evening. I can imagine two such places. One close at hand. The other a few blocks away. But in either case I might not be at liberty to return to my own bed when I pleased.

    I do not think I want to discover anything too important at all. It is too risky.
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