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  • More than 20 years ago I wrote a book entitled Leadership in a Challenging World. In it there was a paragraph on humility. I had not read it in years – until yesterday.

    I am truly humbled by what I wrote back then. I don’t remember ever entertaining the idea of thinking of myself as humble. But, alas, it does seem that I had some clarity about what it means whether I felt I embodied it or not.

    And after reading what I wrote back then, I see that, in some sense, I have dedicated the last two decades of my life since then questing to grow into what I thought back then. Perhaps I’m getting closer. I hope and dream so. I think so.

    Here's what I wrote then:

    ...Though they may be easily confused, humility and submission have little or nothing in common. Submission is demonstrated through being self-effacing or having low self-esteem. In contrast, humility increases rather than diminishes us. It is a recognition of the mystery that is God – or whatever name you use to describe unknown, awesome patterns and creative forces in the universe; it is a connection to the source of all life beyond and within us. And, most specifically, humility connects us to our humanity. It allows us to join the human condition rather than be above it. It reinforces the truth that we are each one miraculous part of the mystery that is life and compels us to honor and seek harmony with all life no matter what its form.


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    [Photo by Barbara, Theo Wirth Meadow, Minneapolis, 2015]
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