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  • The Legon Campus of the University of Ghana is one of the most beautiful spots in Accra. Uncluttered and green Legon Hill gives those who venture up a panoramic view of the vast and expanding suburbs of Accra. After heavy rains the intense clarity allows you to see for miles. So it is to Legon Hill that I go early every Sunday morning with my trusty companion Patz. She is a small dog with a large personality whose joy at being unleashed in a verdant wonderland after a week of being confined to the inner city streets and the balcony of our flat is a wonder to behold. Definitely worth the early start.

    Recently, we extended our walk to the botanical gardens on campus. Unkempt and ramshackle through years of neglect, the gardens are still magical; you can almost feel things growing and changing. Nature doesn’t need much encouragement in Ghana it takes over quickly when controlling backs are turned.

    In one part of the gardens there are cashew trees lining the lane and the abundance of rich sweet fruit in varying states of decay attracts insects in their millions. Attached to almost every tree and within dropping distance of the fruit are monumental ant hills which always remind me of Gaudi’s cathedral in Barcelona. The million ants work incessantly to build their monuments and in the process produce fine, refined red clay. Clay that is ideal for repairing roads and maintaining the university tennis courts apparently. Thus, every so often the ant cathedrals are smashed to pieces and their precious material collected and spirited away. All along the fruit lane ghosts of former hills can be made out in the undergrowth. Still the ants just start over creating more red clay for the tennis courts and the roads.

    Imagine that! Now even the ants work for the man.
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