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  • I don't remember a year with so many rainbows. Maybe it's raining more. Maybe I have just started to look up. Whatever it is, every few weeks, I seem to see one, and every few weeks, I seem to chase one.

    Neither Kermit nor I know why there are so many songs about rainbows, and neither of us knows what's on the other side. Most cultures have thoughts on the phenomena, and some people think of rainbows as a promise from God while others see them as demons from which to hide their children. For some, rainbows represent the highest state achievable before attaining Nirvana. For others, they represent a bridge to another, better world.

    As for me, rainbows make me happy.

    The sudden surprise, the juxtaposition of light and dark, brings a smile to my face. Even though I know what they are, even though I know what causes them and that rain is part of the equation, rainbows fill me with childlike wonder and I love watching the people around me when I see one. I watch to see who looks up, who stops and takes note, whose face fills with joy like my own.

    As so many have sung, including the late, great Israel Kamakawiwo'ole, "The colors of the rainbow so pretty in the sky are also on the faces of people passing by. I see friends shaking hands, saying, 'How do you do?' They're really saying, I... I love you."

    With thoughts like that, who needs a pot of gold?

    Someday I'll wish upon a star,
    Wake up where the clouds are far behind me
    Where trouble melts like lemon drops
    High above the chimney top
    That's where you'll find me
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