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  • As best I can, and granted that is a striving, not a state of being, I arise at 5:30 a.m. to indulge in certain "foods" to fortify me for the life of the day ahead: darkness, silence, peace, the company of cats, the remnants of dreams, good coffee (prepared by a good spouse the night before - and timed), a daily meditation and devotion (currently Richard Rohr's Wondrous Encounters: Scripture for Lent - highly recommended if that be thy bent) all patiently await me on my pantry shelf of morning! Granted, but shamelessly admitted, I give some time and thought to more pedestrian pursuits: a quick check of email (okay, two sites: Word of the Day and Knitting Daily do, in a way, feed me), a glance at CNN Headline News, and yes, ongoing games with a few of my diehard opponents of Words With Friends - and dear readers, you each know and understand that words feed me - and you.

    Which brings me to the centrality of this story.

    I thank my Renaissance-woman-English colleague-dear friend Tracy Kaminer for seeking me out and urging me with "Get thee to Cowbird, quickly" - a wondrous site that feeds the mind, body, and soul and connects fellow writers through the heart and throughout the greater world. Now, added to my morning ritual of gustatory-delights-for-the-mind-and-soul are Cowbird stories - delightful and thoughtful packages filled with words that I have bestowed with a term of endearment: Cowbirdies.

    As with every new endeavor and adventure, there are risks. With Cowbird? Well, stories are like indulgent snacks one will want to reach for, chew on, and savor several times throughout the gift of a day!

    *****************************************************************************

    ***I snapped this photo right near The Great Wall of China in March, 2009, just after purchasing a sack of sesame coated pecans to share with my colleagues as we journeyed along a great wonder - and yet, a kind of sadness, of the world. More on that later.
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