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Coming to america by Deja Osbourne
 

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  • And when I migrated to New York from Russia at the age of 8, i had a really hard time fitting in. I went from being a fun social kid, to a very shy insecure one. I was called all kinds of names and cursed at by kids in my school. My own translator classmate sabotaged me and didn’t translate things to me and then I got yelled at by my teacher. I was told to go back to Russia, even by kids who themselves were from other countries. I began to hate myself. I became terrified of human interaction. I still managed to make a few good friends of all races, but the abuse didn’t stop. I had rocks thrown at me, i was tripped in gym class, and I was threatened to get beat up after school. But unlike my brave friends who stood up to these bullies and made a scene after school getting their butts kicked, I took the high road. Or long road. I changed my path home to avoid getting my butt kicked. I didn’t care about being called any more names, but I did care about the pain of a giant fist in my face. I had no problems running away. Finally I began high school, and the bullying stopped. But the emotional damage was still within me. I was afraid to talk to people, look at people, and participate in class. The idea of people looking at me and laughing terrified me. I couldn’t walk into a convenient store by myself, because I was still terrified one of my old bullies would be in there. I was afraid to talk to grocery clerks even when my family was with me. Because I was afraid they’d bite my head off if I asked for the price. So i made my sister do it. This lasted for another 8 years until I graduated college and started working with real adults and my fear of people slowly vanished. But I was still haunted by all the names I was called. In fact I’ve accumulated a long list of insecurities and things I hated about myself. It took a few more years until I was in my mid 20’s to finally accept myself for who I was. Except for a couple of things I simply couldn’t get over. I felt like a beast. Until one day I heard my coworker mention she had the same issue. But it didn’t sound like a problem to her. And just like that, I no longer felt like a beast. I couldn’t believe how finding 1 person who has something in common with me, made my insecurity vanish. I began to wonder… how many other women have this problem? What if more women have it than not? Then I’m considered normal! All this time I was beating myself up for nothing. I wish there was a website where I can ask a personal question anonymously and have lots of people answer it, and show demographic results. So I can see if who can relate to my question. Is it all women? Is it women of specific race? I continued to come up with tons of other questions. And wanted demographic results based on income, height, weights, zodiac sign and more. I couldn’t find this website online, so I decided to make my own. A few years later I had come up with hundreds and hundreds of questions about beauty, dating, love, intimacy, environment, and more. I felt determined to make this website for every curious person out there. www.wizecat.com was born. I am now creating my Kickstarter campaign for my big launch to raise the funds to develop this website in early 2015.
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