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  • A few days ago, two very pleasant women knocked on my door to tell me about their Jehovah's Witness church and religion, one was a black woman and the other one was white. One of them asked me if I ever had questions on what was the meaning of life and if I prayed about it. I told them that I meditated, that I was a spiritual being having a human experience, and many years ago I had taught Sunday School and Bible School but no longer went to church, because my 'church' was all around me and I could walk to the lake and commune with the Great Mystery. I explained that Jewish people and people of some religions did not use a word, like 'God', because his/her name was not to be spoken and that's why I liked Great Mystery, which is what Native Americans use. To me, Spirit is a Great Mystery.

    They invited me to their church and I explained that I considered myself a Buddhist, (they must not have noticed my two foot high Buddha in Lotus Pose, sitting by the porch steps, amongst the flowers), and when I did go to church I went to UU (Unitarian Universalist), where they accept all religions and many paths leading to the top of the mountain, as each of us has our own path to Spirit. I continued on about how God was portrayed on the Sistine Chapel as a white dude with a beard and that wasn't my image at all, as God isn't white, doesn't have a beard, and isn't a man, (not to mention that the painting is a graven image and blasphemy, according to the ten commandments). They nodded their heads in agreement and told me some points in the Bible that were on this topic and in agreement. We talked a few minutes more and then I told them I had to get back to work and thanked them for stopping by and for our interesting conversation.

    I feel that when church people come calling, even though it differs from my particular religious beliefs, it is important to show our spirituality by how we interact and respond to them and that becomes a confirmation that even though some of our beliefs differ, the point of following a spiritual path is to be kind, respectful, and accepting of others, their beliefs, and their chosen spiritual path. Namaste.
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