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  • I went out on the water yesterday before Hurricane Sandy whips up the bay and then the fall season closes us in.

    The town looks good from the water.

    The new shipyard that opened their doors last year, after years of planning, is full of extraordinary boats. There are dozens of people working to get the boats into dry- dock.

    Many boats have already been captained south, to the Caribbean, for the winter months.

    The coastline connects a long network of boat owners and boat service workers.

    My parents moved to this small coastal town 30 years ago.

    During that time the waterfront here has gone through extensive renovations.

    There used to be a chicken processing plant on the prime site at waters edge.

    There were bodies floating in the water. Chicken bodies.

    A potato skin processing business had a chute out the side of their building.

    I watched open backed trucks pull up and the thick paste of potato waste extrude out of the chute into mounds of mash that went for hog feed.

    The skins were filled with toppings and shipped to Boston for distribution.

    A credit card company, that is a debt servicing facility, moved into the area.

    There was a shift from agrarian and agricultural to digital that sent a ripple of change and money through the area.

    They paid to clean up and renovate the downtown, and they built a park.

    They made some people angry and many people happy, as change tends to do in a sleepy community.

    Tourism and home prices have gone way up and continue to grow, but many homes still languish on the market outside of the coastal fringe.

    With the new boatyard, the second in the harbor, and more and bigger boats, the town is a working water town again.

    They had voted down a plan for more shops and restaurants at the same location because the water heritage meant something to the town council and residents.

    But these are chiefly luxury boats, beautiful pleasure boats. Quiet New England's water peacocks.

    People are talking about the next wave of changes, the new and bigger money here, but what they will see is just the manifestation of what has already occurred.

    We are in a continuum of a world that will not allow a place with charm to remain sleepy.

    Everything has become discovered and wide-awake.

    Oh, and the boats name?

    Weatherbird.

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