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  • I spent five years reporting on New York and most of what I covered was breaking news of the police tape variety. The day I took this photo, I'd been sent to Sunset Park, Brooklyn to report on a series of late-night gropings and sex assaults.

    But when I got there, true to its name, Sunset Park was sunny and sleepy and had a nice old-fashioned feeling. I saw a sign for $5 haircuts, a man slicing mangoes with a machete, taco joints with bright flags hanging outside, stores selling satin flowers and air-brushed birthday cakes.

    I stopped when I saw this woman. My job gave me license to ask complete strangers questions that would seem bizarre if I weren't carrying a notebook and a press pass, like whether they thought bullfights should be illegal or whether they would date someone who already had children. It also gave me license to just stop and talk for awhile.

    When I sat down to write a news story after a day of reporting I liked to think I was setting down facts, quotes—but this photograph is a reminder that I was also recording my experience in these places. If you look closely, you can see me reflected in the glass, a smiling ghost beside the woman and her child.

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